National Videogame Museum closes to observe the second national lockdown

The NVM has closed to observe the second national lockdown starting November 3rd and currently ending 2nd December.

This sad news followed a very successful half term, where the NVM sold 86% of all tickets and welcomed over 700 visitors. We had some lovely feedback from people wanting to let us know not just how good a time they had but how safe they felt in our venue.

 

 

 

 

The NVM’s safety procedures were developed through consultation with our visitors and staff and have been working so well.

While our audience cannot visit in person, our team is gearing up to restart our award winning online programme which offers more ways to play and learn at home, so watch this space for more news on our new lockdown activities.

https://thenvm.org/learning/learn-at-home/

https://thenvm.org/learning/pixelheads/

https://www.youtube.com/thenationalvideogamemuseum

 

BREAKING – National Videogame Museum wins Kids in Museums award

We’ve just heard that the National Videogame Museum has won an award for Best Website activity in the Family Friendly Museums Award 2020, run by the charity, Kids in Museums. The BGI is so proud of our Learning Officer, Leah Dungay and our Marcomms Officer, Conor Clarke, for launching our NVM at Home activities within days of lockdown in March. The activities, which show families how to use free online development tools to make games art, design and narrative content, have been enjoyed by thousands of children, with very high engagement and completion rates. We’ve had a lot of happy parents sharing their children’s work, which are a great first step towards learning the STEAM skills we all need to thrive in the modern world. You can still play the activites on our YouTube channel as well as download materials to use at home. Here’s the first one ever broadcast:

We’ve always known our programmes can inspire young people whatever their background to do amazing things. It’s lovely to have that validated by the museum sector. Read some case studies of how we’ve helped children from the most disadvantaged areas.

 

BGI appoints a Director of Visitor Experience

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sheffield 13/10/2020:  The charity has announced the appointment of Hannah Bryan to lead the Visitor Experience team at the National Videogame Museum.

Hannah joins the resurgent museum to lead a new team focused on enhancing value for the charity’s 35,000-strong visitor community.

Formerly the Head of Audience Development and Programming at The Auckland Project, Hannah focused on increasing footfall, developing income streams and running marketing campaigns across multiple sites.

The new Director role leads a team of 16 staff and crew to enhance visitor experiences at the Museum, support the charity’s strategic development and develop data-driven approaches to operating the Museum.

You can meet all the BGI’s team here.

Note to Editors
A press pack including images and video of the NVM is available here.

If you would like to arrange an interview, please contact Conor using conor@thenvm.org.

About the National Videogame Museum
The NVM is governed by the BGI, a registered charity number 1183530, that educates the public about the art, science, history and technology of videogames. For more details about the NVM, please visit: http://www.thenvm.org

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The Games Education Summit delivers again

GamesEd 20 ran last week as a virtual conference with 40 speakers covering a wide range of games education topics including the impact of Covid and Brexit. Industry leaders from Unity, Epic Games, Creative Assembly, Sumo Digital, Codemasters, Aardvark Swift and Playground Games joined courses leaders, Deans and Heads of School from Norwich University of the Arts, and Sheffield Hallam, Staffordshire, Bournemouth and Portsmouth Universities, amongst many others. Third sector trailblazers such as Ukie, Digital SchoolHouse, TIGA, Into Games, G into Gaming and Gayming Magazine were convened by the BGI for another exciting  conference, this time joined by a diverse group of students and interns who shared their experiences of their journeys towards games careers.

You can read coverage on the Summit on GamesIndustry.biz.

A Discord channel has been set up to maintain the conversation between this Covid-delayed Summit in September and the next Summit in the Spring of 2021. The channel is now open to anyone interested in the subject.

The sessions were recorded and are now available to watch for those unable to attend:

You can watch all the sessions on the BGI’s YouTube channel.

 

National Videogame Museum is recruiting a new Director of Visitor Experience

The BGI’s National Videogame Museum is looking for a Director of Visitor Experience to lead the Visitor Experience team, ensure a high quality visitor experience and support the charity’s strategic development. The new role will provide strong leadership in day-to-day operations and commercial development of the Museum, working alongside the Culture Director and the Curatorial team. This role will sit on the Exec Board of the charity, report directly to the CEO and attend trustee board meetings.

Read the full job description and application process here.

[Please note this recruitment process is now closed]

Paul Wedgwood joins stellar list of videogames leaders and companies helping the National Videogame Museum survive

We’re delighted to announce that Paul Wedgwood has become the latest patron of the National Videogame Museum.When making his donation, Paul wrote:

This is a great cultural cause – we’re way behind the film industry in this. The NVM deserves far more support from those of us that have done so well within the British games industry.

The trustees and staff send a massive thank you to Paul for his generosity.

NVM launches livestreaming service for families during lockdown

Following the BGI trustees’ decision to temporarily close the National Videogame Museum to protect the public and staff from Coronavirus, the charity is launching a new series of livestreams and materials for families to access at home.

The NVM will begin livestreaming workshops and programmes on YouTube and Twitch in mid-April, bringing a range of the NVM’s popular workshops to the public, as well as a new range of magazine shows.

In a series of weekly livestreams, museum staff will start teaching families how to create art and games narratives using free software packages such as Piskel, Twine and Scratch. Staff will also review and play through educational games sites, conduct live discussions with games studios near Sheffield, and start sharing its expertise in videogame perservation and curation in a forthcoming series designed for museums and enthusiasts in its recent Videogame Heritage Society.

The charity’s initiative was triggered by thousands of requests for materials on its NVM at Home page, which it launched in March in response to its closure.

 

 

National Videogame Museum closes to protect visitors and staff 

Museum shuts temporarily as Coronavirus outbreak worsens

Sheffield 1200 16/03/2020: The BGI, which operates the National Videogame Museum, announced it was temporarily closing the Museum with immediate effect in response to the COVID-19 outbreak.

Ian Livingstone CBE, Chair of the BGI and NVM founder patron, said: “We are immensely proud to run one of the most interactive museums in the country and we take great care over hygiene standards, but we owe a duty of care to our visitors and staff during the current Coronavirus outbreak. Before the Museum records its first case, the charity’s trustees have taken the difficult decision to temporarily close the National Videogame Museum to protect our community and our people. The National Videogame Museum is now under threat. As a new charity, we have no safety net of public funding to support us through the Coronavirus outbreak. We call on the government to help support at-risk organisations like ours now.”

The National Videogame Museum hosted over 40,000 visitors including scores of schools in 2019. It runs exhibitions, events, workshops and other school sessions linked to the national curriculum. Its mission statement is to create unique playable exhibitions about videogames; inspire children about what games mean and how they are made; reveal career paths into the UK’s fastest growing creative industry; and encourage everyone, whatever their background, to play, understand and make games.

The BGI’s Director of Culture Iain Simons said “Our decision to suspend the Museum will protect our visitor community and our staff until it’s safe to reopen. This is a particularly difficult decision for us, coming just after a record half term with over 2,500 visitors in 10 days and before a full programme of events, workshops and new exhibitions rolling into the Summer”.

The NVM is the only museum in the UK solely dedicated to the collection and preservation of videogame culture and is one of the leading institutions in the world in this field. The charity is mostly funded by visitor ticket sales, with additional patronage from some games companies and individuals, and grants from private trusts and foundations. It currently receives no public funding for running the Museum.

“Like many independent museums, our funding has always been tight, so we are hugely grateful to those individuals, companies and trusts that have stepped up and supported us as we launched our Museum in Sheffield. Despite videogames being one of the most loved and consumed cultural forms in the world, public funding to support them is minimal. The BGI, an educational charity, is working to change that through the NVM and other programmes, but the risk with Coronavirus is that a whole class of cultural institutions like ours could disappear if funding is prioritised towards bigger, better known and already well-funded organisations.” said Rick Gibson, BGI CEO.

The charity announced the decision as other organisations voluntarily suspended public spaces. The charity hopes to raise sufficient funds to re-open after the Coronavirus has peaked later this year.

Notes to Editors
A press pack including images and video of the galleries is available here.

Interviews

If you would like to interview BGI trustees and staff, please contact Conor Clarke on conor@thenvm.org or 07939 465667.

Interviewees

Ian Livingstone CBE
Ian is one of the founding fathers of the UK games industry and has a long track record of working to support the growth of the sector. He co-founded iconic games company Games Workshop in 1975, and co-created the Fighting Fantasy gamebooks in 1982 which have sold over 17 million copies to date. He designed Eureka, the first computer game published by Domark in 1984, and joined the company in 1992 as a major investor and director, overseeing a merger that created Eidos plc in 1995, where he served as Executive Chairman until 2002. At Eidos he launched major franchises including Lara Croft: Tomb Raider. He co-authored the Next Gen review in 2011 published by Nesta, recommending changes in ICT education policy to bring computer science into the national curriculum as an essential discipline. He is a serial angel investor in multiple UK games studios, chair of Playdemic and PlayMob, and Member of the Creative Industries Council and Creative Industries Federation. He was appointed OBE in 2006, and has also received a BAFTA Special Award, a British Inspiration Award, the Develop Legend Award, an Honorary Doctorate of Arts by Bournemouth University and an Honorary Doctorate of Technology by Abertay University, Dundee for his contribution to the UK computer and video games industry. He was appointed CBE in the 2013 New Year Honours list.

Iain Simons, Culture Director, the BGI
Iain co-founded the National Videogame Archive of the UK in 2008, directs the GameCity festival, which he founded in 2006, and founded the National Videogame Arcade which became the National Videogame Museum and moved to Sheffield in 2018. As well as developing curatorial and interpretive strategies for the BGI and the National Videogame Museum, he speaks about videogame culture internationally for a wide variety of audiences and has written for both the popular and academic press, as well as several books including Difficult Questions About Videogames (Suppose, 2004), Inside Game Design (Lawrence King, 2007) and a History of Videogames (Carlton, 2018) with Professor James Newman.

Rick Gibson, Founder and CEO, The BGI
A games strategist for 20 years, Rick founded 2 pan-industry campaigns: Games Up?, which successfully campaigned for the introduction of Video Games Tax Relief (VGTR), a relief that has paid out over £500m to UK games companies since it began in 2014; and for the foundation of the BGI itself, which won the support of over 560 games and cultural organisations and he founded in 2019.

 

About the National Videogame Museum
The NVM is run by the BGI, a registered charity number 1183530 that educates the public about the art, science, history and technology of videogames. The NVM celebrates videogame culture and allows the public to play most of its exhibits, which include games consoles, arcade machines and other interactive experiences, including games designed exclusively for the Museum. The Museum displays the UK’s only permanently accessible collection of over 100 videogames as well as a large collection of game memorabilia and ephemera. Formerly the National Videogame Arcade in Nottingham, the Museum has welcomed over 120,000 visitors, including hundreds of school visits, since it opened in 2016. The Museum presents a mixture of permanent and temporary exhibitions that are scheduled up to 2 years in advance, some of which tour the UK. For more details about the NVM, please visit: http://www.thenvm.org

Games Education Summit moves to September

The BGI announced today that the GamesEd20 Summit is moving back to September 7th and 8th at the same venue in Sheffield Hallam University. The Coronavirus has impacted the availability of delegates and key contributors to attend in April, and therefore the charity and the Summit’s steering committee has taken the difficult decision to move the Summit to later in the year.

Tickets are still available at gamesed20.eventbrite.com/.

National Videogame Museum Launches Videogames Preservation Network

Before It’s Too Late: Saving Videogames.

National Videogame Museum Launches Videogames Preservation Network

 Sheffield, 25/02/2020: The National Videogame Museum is launching a new initiative today at BFI Southbank, leading a network of museums and independent collectors who are engaged in videogame preservation. The Videogame Heritage Society (VHS) includes the Science and Media Museum, Bath Spa University, British Library and Museum of London as well as many independent collectors. It will develop best practice and share knowledge across the museum sector and beyond about preserving and exhibiting videogames.

Ian Livingstone, chair of the BGI (the charity which governs the NVM) commented, “This group is for anyone who cares about or works in videogame preservation. We recognise that in the UK and around the world, the expertise in this field isn’t just locked inside museums and heritage institutions, but also inside a wide range of dedicated and passionate private collectors. The VHS will bring everyone together to preserve the important heritage of videogames in our country.”

The event today will also mark the launch of a new White Paper: ‘Time Extend’, on video game history, heritage and preservation. There will also be a special address from legendary Nintendo console designer Masayuki Uemura. The National Videogame Museum has worked closely alongside Uemura, who is a professor at Ritsumeikan University in Kyoto and is giving a talk at the NVM on 26th February.

The NVM preserves the history of UK development through its UK Collection, a special collection within the Museum that focuses on the story of British videogames creation. This was recently launched with Rebellion, the first studio to formally collaborate with the NVM on the project.

Gina Jackson, Trustee for the BGI, said “In order to develop as an art form, to become more diverse and reflect all kinds of areas of our lives, and to build a cultural confidence that is sometimes absent, we need to be able to learn about videogames. In order to learn about them, we need to be able to access them and make sense of them. The work we’re doing at the NVM and BGI isn’t out of nostalgia. It’s out of a concern for the future. We want to be able to inspire and educate new kinds of game-makers to make new kinds of games.”

Notes to Editors

Interviews

If you would like to interview BGI trustees or NVM staff, please contact Conor Clarke on conor@thenvm.org or 0114 321 0299.

About the National Videogame Museum

The NVM is a museum in Sheffield run by the charity the BGI that educates the public on the art, science, history and technology of videogames. The NVM celebrates videogame culture and allows the public to play most of its exhibits, which include games consoles, arcade machines and other interactive experiences, including games designed exclusively for the Museum. The Museum displays the UK’s only permanently accessible collection of videogames as well as a large collection of game memorabilia and ephemera. Formerly the National Videogame Arcade in Nottingham, the Museum has welcomed over 140,000 visitors, including hundreds of school visits, since it opened in 2016. The Museum presents a mixture of permanent and temporary exhibitions, some of which tour the UK. For more details about the NVM, please visit: http://www.thenvm.org